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What to read this week? Here are the 8 most intriguing stories for art lovers.

 

A Review of the Garage Triennial of Russian Contemporary Art, Moscow
By Christian Viveros-Fauné/ Arteviste

‘Russia, newly fearsome and obscure, is very much in the news, but not for reasons that invite open cultural exchange. America’s Cold War adversary for four frosty decades, Russia—then called the Soviet Union—underwent a brief glasnost, or period of transparency during the late 1980s and early 1990s. What followed afterwards was its polar opposite. To borrow a phrase from William Styron, today the largest country on earth exemplifies the idea of darkness visible.’

First published on Artnet.

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Monstrations, May 1, 2016, Photo and video documentation, Photo Sergei Mordvinov, Courtesy Artem Loskutov


The Art of Protest
By Anika Hashem / The Spectator

Nina Simone once asked, “How can you be an artist and not reflect the times?”

Art has been around for a long time and it’s difficult to pinpoint when it was first used as a form of protest. Each person who creates art to protest has a unique, personal reason behind their protest, and their creation, whether it’s music, dancing, or traditional painting, reflects it.

More here


Olaf Breuning | a “love-hate relationship” with contemporary art
By Virna Gvero / Happening

“I wish I could be a painter and I wish I could be a writer.” Despite having worked with a plethora of mediums — including drawing, sculpture, photography, film and installation — during his 18-year long career, artist Olaf Breuning is still pining for more.

Innovation is key for the Swiss-born artist, who has now lived in New York for over a decade, where he has just finished installing his latest exhibition at Metro Pictures gallery, (running March 17 through April 15) presenting a new series of drawings and ceramic sculptures.

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From the series Art Freaks. Installation view, 2016. NRW-Forum Düsseldorf, Germany. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York


How I see Britain: photographs that define the country
By The Gurdian

Former Guardian picture editor Eamonn McCabe’s TV series Britain in Focus has been charting the history of photography in the UK. Here, Irvine Welsh, Sadiq Khan, Jeanette Winterson, Nadav Kander and others pick the shots that sum up Britishness for them

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Northumbrian coalminer and his wife, 1937,Photograph Bill Brandt


Designer JW Anderson Brings ‘Disobedient Bodies’ to the Hepworth Wakefield
By Hettie Judah / Artnet News

His show is a meditation on the human form as re-imagined in sculpture, fashion, ceramics, dance, and design.

The latest development in the art world’s off-again, on-again romance with fashion comes courtesy a fecund hook-up between the Hepworth Wakefield and designer JW Anderson. On Thursday last, elegant, Yorkshire-based Hepworth (6) and boyish, Derry-born Anderson (34) glowed with pride at the first public outing of their offspring, the handsome exhibition “Disobedient Bodies.”

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Disobedient Bodies JW Anderson curates The Hepworth Wakefield, Photo Lewis Ronald



From the Contemporary Lynx archives:

THE 9th BERLIN BIENNALE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART

Written by Kasia Lorenc / Contemporary Lynx

In the days running up to the Berlin Biennale, there was a definite feeling of unease in the air.  Would DIS, that hipster collective, present us only with visions of a utopia, picked out in every shade of the rainbow? In the end, they present us with a heady mix of what already is and what may yet be, in full spectrum technicolour.

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Installationsansicht von "There’s a word I’m trying to remember, for a feeling I’m about to have (a distracted path toward extinction)", 2016; Courtesy Korakrit Arunanondchai/Alex Gvojic; C L E A R I N G, New York/Brussels; Carlos/Ishikawa, London; Foto: Timo Ohler

Installationsansicht von “There’s a word I’m trying to remember, for a feeling I’m about to have (a distracted path toward extinction)”, 2016; Courtesy Korakrit Arunanondchai/Alex Gvojic; C L E A R I N G, New York/Brussels; Carlos/Ishikawa, London; Foto: Timo Ohler

 

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