photo: Patrycja Głusiec
profile

A place where sculptures live A visit to Wanda Czełkowska’s atelier

[polska wersja językowa poniżej]

One poster attracted a lot of attention among Warsaw residents. It featured a woman with a partly covered face, evoking anxiety and at the same inviting viewers to Królikarnia – the Xawery Dunikowski Sculpture Museum, to visit an exhibition entitled “Wanda Czełkowska. Retrospection”. At the end of 2016, the exhibition not only reminded us about the creative work of a unique independent artist but was also an opportunity for a wider audience to get to know her works. 

photo: Patrycja Głusiec
photo: Patrycja Głusiec

Although the studio owned by this sculptor, who died in 2021, was listed on the Warsaw Historic Art Ateliers list, not many art enthusiasts know of its existence. I have recently had a chance to get to know the history of this exceptional place – a witness to the artist’s creative work and thought.

Wanda Czełkowska came to Warsaw in 2004, at the age of 74. She arrived to the capital city from Kraków, where she had had her art studio in an annexe at Grabowskiego Street. After her moving to Warsaw, the artist used an atelier adjacent to the house at Morszyńska Street in Sadyba. Because of a limited space, she had to rent an additional storage area at Wałbrzyska Street. She needed much more space for her “children”, as she used to call her sculptures. She also believed that her works were undergoing a continuous process and creating mutual relations, which is why they needed to stay close to her. The symbol of her approach to own creative works was the motif of Pygmalion which the artist liked very much. This archetype of an artist who loves their works even appeared in one of the medals designed by Czełkowska. 

photo: Patrycja Głusiec
photo: Patrycja Głusiec

A dream place in Mokotów

In 2010 she managed to find a place for her studio in Mokotów, not far from Królikarnia. It was a hall of a former truck repair shop at 14A Magazynowa Street. The artist was very enthusiastic and considered it to be a perfect place for her – a huge hall filled with light coming from large windows. The entire space covers the area of around two hundred and sixty square meters, while the atelier itself is about a hundred and fifty square metres. If that weren’t enough, the Druga Strefa theatre had its premises right next door, also in the workshop building. The sculptor quickly won the favour of the theatre’s director, Sylwester Biraga, and the owners of both premises soon became friends.

A studio with the title of a Warsaw Historic Art Atelier

Before Czełkowska was able to start using her perfect atelier, she had to arrange a number of matters. Her friend, Wanda Warska, and Mokotów District Councillor, Bożena Kłosińska-Krauze provided their support to the artist. After the completion of renovation works, which the workshop required, it became home to Czełkowska’s sculptures. At the time, it was timidly called a “studio”. It was officially a commercial unit, leased for Czełkowska by the Szczecin-based Kapitańska Gallery, and later by a certain foundation since 2017. The title of a Warsaw Historic Art Atelier was granted to the studio in 2019. It was an elevating event for the artist that strengthened her mentally. At last, the place of her creative work could lawfully function as a sculpture atelier.

The atelier was always a priority to Wanda Czełkowska. It was a place of her intellectual work, which is extremely important for a thinker and a total artist. Moreover, the artist lived there for eight years, as she allocated all her property to continue her artistic activities. The materials which sculptors use are extremely expensive. The artist compared her profession to film-makers who first need to raise some funds to start making their idea come true. She treated the space of the atelier as a place to live and a location for her sculptures.

Unfortunately, as we can imagine, it was not a place suitable for housing purposes. The conditions there were difficult – it was not easy to heat such a large area, so it was cold there in the winter. An opportunity to rent a flat for the sculptor came in 2018, and it was very close to the studio, at 13B Magazynowa Street. Only then was Wanda Czełkowska able to separate her living and working space, and enjoy better housing conditions.

photo: Patrycja Głusiec
photo: Patrycja Głusiec

An individualist following her own creative paths

For many artists, their studios are the meeting places where they socialise, while for Czełkowska, her studio was primarily a place for hard work. It does not mean that she did not have any guests though – art historians and gallery owners used to come to visit her. We need to bear in mind that these were meetings of beginners with an authority, a mature artist. It can be said that Czełkowska was the last generation of artists.

Czełkowska was professionally active for fifty years. Although she was familiar with graphics and painting, sculpture was the most rewarding to her and with her innovativeness, she was crossing the boundaries of this form of art. During her studies at the Academy of Fine Arts, she got to be known as an individualist, an artist who followed her own artistic paths. Her style had little in common with the Socialist Realism prevailing at the time. Her famous Neo-Primitivism portraits were created in that period. Czełkowska’s creative work is associated with such avant-garde art trends as expressionism and conceptual art but it would be wrong to pigeonhole such an unconventional and original figure. 

photo: Patrycja Głusiec
photo: Patrycja Głusiec

Sculptures facing the wall

During her lifetime, the artist was not enthusiastic about showcasing her works, as she was a very reserved person. Even in her atelier, the sculptures were covered and often facing the wall. She believed that only exhibitions were the right occasions to demonstrate her works. She wanted the place to function as an art atelier even after she would no longer be with us. According to her wish, after she died an exhibition was created there, giving the visitors a hint of how rich Czełkowska’s creative work was. The artist is present in every element and every item has its artistic meaning. The place is filled with the atmosphere of her creative energy.

As we pass the entrance to the studio, our attention is immediately drawn by the books Czełkowska loved so much and in which she looked for inspiration and answers to questions which were bothering her, just like a true intellectual. The artist’s bed is still next to the bookshelf. The next room, the largest part of the workshop space, is the atelier proper. This is where we can admire the works by the artist from various periods of her career. 

The current custodian of the place decided to use the remaining parts of the studio to create space for the conservation of Czełkowska’s works. There is still a large number of sculptures, paintings, and drawings waiting to be shown to the world. 

photo: Patrycja Głusiec
photo: Patrycja Głusiec

The atelier to be opened in May

The official opening of the atelier to the public is due to be held in May 2022. The place will be made available for visitors for a month. They will have the opportunity to see the artist’s works, for example her work entitled “The End of the Century, or an Infinite Straight Line” (1996-1997). The organisers planned workshops which will be held on the last day of the opening period, on 1st June, Children’s Day. The classes called “Wanda Czełkowska for Children” will be run by Berenika Kowalska, Emilia Dragosz, and Artur Kopka.

The invitation for youngsters should not come as a surprise because the artist nurtured her inner child, she enjoyed laughing and joking, and she loved animals. Numerous examples of child-like temperament can be found in her art. Czełkowska treated every recipient of her art extremely seriously. That is why on that special day, children will be able to create their own sculptures, which will be later showcased in one of the smaller rooms of the atelier, on an actual exhibition.

photo: Patrycja Głusiec
photo: Patrycja Głusiec

The artist’s works will not be forgotten

May will not be the only opportunity to visit the place. During the visit by the representatives of CIMAM (International Committee for Museums and Collections of Modern Art) in November, Wanda Czełkowska’s workplace will be presented as an example of one of the Warsaw Historic Art Ateliers. The plans to organise exhibitions of the artist’s works are beginning to take shape. The first one will take place at the Monopol Gallery in Warsaw, as Czełkowska had promised to cooperate with them before she passed away. We hope that the artist’s creative work will not be forgotten and will reach increasingly wider circles of viewers.


Miejsce życia rzeźb.

Z wizytą w pracowni Wandy Czełkowskiej

Ten plakat przyciągał uwagę warszawiaków. Patrzyła z niego kobieta z częściowo zasłonięta twarzą, wywołująca niepokój i jednocześnie zapraszająca do Królikarni – Muzeum Rzeźby im. Xawerego Dunikowskiego na wystawę „Wanda Czełkowska. Retrospekcja”. Ekspozycja pod koniec 2016 roku nie tylko przypomniała twórczość oryginalnej, niezależnej artystki, lecz również dała szansę szerszej publiczności na jej poznanie. 

Chociaż dwa lata temu pracownia zmarłej w 2021 roku rzeźbiarki została wpisana na listę Warszawskich Historycznych Pracowni Artystycznych, wciąż niewielu wielbicieli sztuki wie o jej istnieniu. Niedawno miałam przyjemność poznać historię tego wyjątkowego miejsca – świadka twórczości i myśli artystycznej.

photo: Patrycja Głusiec
photo: Patrycja Głusiec

W Warszawie Wanda Czełkowska pojawiła się dopiero w 2004 roku – miała już wówczas 74 lata. Przyjechała do stolicy z Krakowa, gdzie w oficynie przy ulicy Grabowskiego mieściła się jej pracownia artystyczna. Po przeprowadzce do stolicy artystka korzystała z przydomowej pracowni przy ulicy Morszyńskiej na Sadybie. Ze względu na ograniczoną przestrzeń była zmuszona wynająć dodatkowo magazyn przy ul. Wałbrzyskiej. Dla „dzieci”, jak pieszczotliwie nazywała swoje prace, potrzebowała zdecydowanie większej przestrzeni. Uważała także, że jej prace są w ciągłym procesie i wchodzą ze sobą w relacje, dlatego powinny pozostawać blisko niej. Symbolem jej stosunku do własnej twórczości stał się motyw Pigmaliona, wyjątkowo przez artystkę lubiany. Ten archetyp artysty darzącego uczuciem swoje dzieła, pojawił się nawet na jednym z zaprojektowanych przez Czełkowską medali. 

Wymarzone miejsce na Mokotowie

W 2010 roku miejsce na pracownię udało się znaleźć na Mokotowie, zresztą niedaleko Królikarni. Była to hala dawnego warsztatu naprawy ciężarówek przy ulicy Magazynowej 14A. Artystka z dużym entuzjazmem uznała, że to doskonałe miejsce właśnie dla niej. Ogromna hala wypełniona światłem wpadającym przez duże okna. Cała przestrzeń ma około dwustu sześćdziesięciu metrów kwadratowych, natomiast pracownia właściwa około stu pięćdziesięciu. Na dodatek tuż obok, również w warsztacie, ma swoją siedzibę teatr Druga Strefa. Rzeźbiarka szybko zyskała przychylność jego dyrektora Sylwestra Biragi, a właściciele obu miejsc szczerze się zaprzyjaźnili.

photo: Patrycja Głusiec
photo: Patrycja Głusiec

Pracownia z tytułem Warszawskiej Historycznej Pracowni Artystycznej

Zanim jednak Czełkowska mogła zacząć korzystać z wymarzonej pracowni, należało jeszcze podjąć cały szereg działań. W tym pomogły artystce jej przyjaciółka Wanda Warska oraz mokotowska radna Bożena Kłosińska-Krauze. Ostatecznie po remoncie, którego warsztat wymagał, stał się on domem dla rzeźb Czełkowskiej. Wówczas jeszcze nieśmiało nazywano go pracownią. Oficjalnie był to lokal użytkowy, wynajmowany dla Czełkowskiej przez szczecińską Galerię Kapitańską, a od 2017 pewną fundację. Dopiero w 2019 roku miasto nadało mu tytuł Warszawskiej Historycznej Pracowni Artystycznej. Było to dla artystki nobilitujące i podbudowało ją psychicznie. Jej miejsce twórczości mogło w końcu legalnie funkcjonować jako pracownia rzeźbiarska.

Dla Wandy Czełkowskiej pracownia była zawsze priorytetem. Stanowiła miejsce pracy intelektualnej, co jest niezwykle ważne w przypadku myślicielki, artystki totalnej. Ponadto przez osiem lat rzeźbiarka w niej mieszkała, ponieważ wszystkie dobra materialne przeznaczała na kontynuowanie działalności twórczej. Tworzywa, których używają rzeźbiarze, są wyjątkowo kosztowne. Artystka przyrównywała nawet swój zawód do profesji filmowca, który najpierw musi zebrać środki finansowe, aby w ogóle zacząć realizować pomysł. Traktowała przestrzeń pracowni jako miejsce do życia oraz przestrzeń dla swoich rzeźb.

Niestety, jak łatwo sobie wyobrazić, nie było to miejsce przystosowane do mieszkania. Panujące w nim warunki były trudne: tak wielką przestrzeń nie było łatwo ogrzać, więc zimą panował tam chłód. Dopiero w 2018 roku udało się wynająć dla rzeźbiarki mieszkanie bardzo blisko pracowni, przy ulicy Magazynowej 13B. Dopiero wtedy Czełkowska mogła oddzielić przestrzeń domu od przestrzeni do pracy i cieszyć się lepszymi warunkami bytowymi.

photo: Patrycja Głusiec
photo: Patrycja Głusiec

Indywidualistka chodząca swoimi twórczymi drogami

Dla wielu artystów pracownia stanowi ważne miejsce spotkań towarzyskich, natomiast dla Czełkowskiej była ona przede wszystkim miejscem ciężkiej pracy. Co nie znaczy, że w ogóle nie przyjmowała gości. Owszem, zjawiali się tam historycy sztuki i właściciele galerii. Trzeba jednak pamiętać, że były to spotkania z autorytetem, dojrzałej artystki z początkującymi. Można powiedzieć, że Czełkowska była kimś w rodzaju ostatniego Mohikanina swojego pokolenia artystów.

Czełkowska pozostawała aktywna zawodowo przez pięćdziesiąt lat. Chociaż nieobce jej były grafika i malarstwo, realizowała się przede wszystkim w rzeźbie, a swoim nowatorstwem stale poszerzała granice tej dyscypliny sztuki. Już podczas studiów w krakowskiej Akademii Sztuk Pięknych dała się poznać jako indywidualistka, artystka chodząca swoimi własnymi twórczymi drogami. Jej styl nie wpisywał się w obowiązujący wtedy realizm socjalistyczny. Z tego okresu pochodzą choćby jej słynne portrety neoprymitywistyczne. Twórczość Czełkowskiej jest kojarzona z takimi kierunkami sztuki awangardowej, jak ekspresjonizm czy konceptualizm, ale błędem byłoby jakiekolwiek szufladkowanie postaci tak nieszablowej i oryginalnej. 

photo: Patrycja Głusiec
photo: Patrycja Głusiec

Rzeźby odwrócone do ściany

Za życia artystka niechętnie pokazywała swoje prace, była osobą wyjątkowo skrytą. Nawet w pracowni rzeźby były zawinięte, często odwrócone do ściany. Uważała, że dzieła swój czas eksponowania mają dopiero na wystawach. Zależało jej na tym, aby to miejsce funkcjonowało jako pracownia artystyczna nawet wtedy, gdy ona już odejdzie. Zgodnie z tym życzeniem po jej śmierci powstała tam ekspozycja, która odwiedzającemu daje wyobrażenie, jak niezwykle bogata była twórczość Czełkowskiej. Artystka jest tutaj obecna w każdym elemencie, każdy obiekt ma swoje artystyczne znaczenie. Można poczuć atmosferę przepełnioną jej twórczą energią.

Zaraz przy wejściu do pracowni uwagę przyciągają ukochane przez Czełkowską książki, w których, jak na intelektualistkę przystało, poszukiwała inspiracji oraz odpowiedzi na nurtujące pytania. Obok biblioteczki wciąż stoi łóżko artystki. Kolejne pomieszczenie, stanowiące największą część przestrzeni warsztatu, to już pracownia. To tutaj można podziwiać prace rzeźbiarki z różnych okresów twórczości. 

Pozostałe, mniejsze części pracowni, jej obecna opiekunka przeznaczyła na konserwację dzieł Czełkowskiej. W hali znajduje się jeszcze wiele jej rzeźb, obrazów i rysunków czekających na przedstawienie światu.

photo: Patrycja Głusiec
photo: Patrycja Głusiec

Pracownia zaprasza w maju

W maju 2022 roku planowane jest oficjalne otwarcie pracowni dla publiczności. Miejsce będzie dostępne dla zwiedzających przez miesiąc. Wszyscy będą mieli okazję zobaczyć zrealizowane prace artystki, m.in. dzieło „Koniec wieku, czyli prosta nieskończona” (1996–1997). Na zakończenie udostępniania pracowni 1 czerwca, czyli w Dzień Dziecka, organizatorzy przygotowali warsztaty. Zajęcia „Wanda Czełkowska dzieciom” poprowadzą Berenika Kowalska, Emilia Dragosz oraz Artur Kopka.

Zaproszenie do pracowni najmłodszych nie powinno dziwić, ponieważ artystka zawsze pielęgnowała w sobie dziecko, lubiła się śmiać i dowcipkować, uwielbiała zwierzęta. W jej sztuce można odnaleźć wiele przykładów dziecinnego temperamentu. Jednak Czełkowska każdego odbiorcę sztuki traktowała niezwykle poważnie. Dlatego właśnie dzieci w tym szczególnym miejscu będą mogły stworzyć swoje rzeźby, aby następnie w jednej z mniejszych przestrzeni pracowni zaprezentować je na prawdziwej, własnej wystawie.

photo: Patrycja Głusiec
photo: Patrycja Głusiec

Twórczość artystki nie zostanie zapomniana

Maj nie będzie jedyną okazją do odwiedzenia tego miejsca. Podczas listopadowej wizyty przedstawicieli CIMAM (International Committee for Museums and Collections of Modern Art) miejsce pracy Wandy Czełkowskiej będzie prezentowane jako przykład Warszawskiej Historycznej Pracowni Artystycznej. Coraz realniejszych kształtów nabierają również plany wystaw prac artystki. Pierwsza odbędzie się w Galerii Monopol w Warszawie, której Czełkowska obiecała współpracę jeszcze za życia. Liczymy na to, że twórczość artystki nie zostanie zapomniana i będzie prezentowana coraz szerszemu gronu publiczności.

Radakcja: Dorota Rzeszewska, Magdalena Łań

Return to the homepage

About The Author

Patrycja
Głusiec

a graduate of Polish Philology and Art History based in Warsaw. She joined Contemporary Lynx in 2019, and is now the Social Media Manager. Working for the magazine, she creates a space for contemporary photography. She gained experience by working at the National Museum in Warsaw and by cooperating with Foksal Gallery Foundation.

This might interest you