Instagram

DESIGNING THE LANDSCAPE OF TODAY’S WARSAW.

VISITING THE HISTORIC ART STUDIO OF PAULINA TYRO-NIEZGODA

[polska wersja językowa poniżej]
Art Studio of Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, photo by Michał Korta

Art Studio of Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, photo by Michał Korta

 

A sunny day, the Warsaw New Town market square on the other side of which sits St. Casimir Church designed by Tylman van Gameren in Palladian style. This is a picturesque, postcard-like spot which mainly attracts tourists, so local residents are barely to be noticed in the crowd. This is the reason why taking a walk in this enchanting part of the city makes you reflect on the old stories of people born in Warsaw and on the history of the city witnessed by the walls of beautiful historic tenement houses. They are frequently seen as merely tourist attractions, but nevertheless, this is exactly where remarkable and vivid stories of today’s Warsaw residents unfold and where those working in the field of culture and art spend their time creating. Culture has always been the driving force of social changes and a vital element of identity of a given group. In these old houses and studios hidden behind the historic walls the Warsaw of today is created.

Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, an exhibition designer, invited me to her spacious studio in the attic of one of the buildings situated right next to the Warsaw New Town market square (Freta street) to help me uncover one of the mysteries the regular tourists can only wonder about. It needs to be emphasized that this studio is located within the area of the Old Town, that is, in the centre of Warsaw. This location undeniably combines tradition and city centre modernity.

The studio owner since the early 1980s was Paulina’s grandmother, Barbara Pisarczyk-Niezgoda, who was a painter, an illustrator and who documented historic architecture. For some time, Barbara shared the studio with her son, Paweł, who obtained a diploma in industrial design, and his wife, Alina Tyro-Niezgoda. The space which accommodated the three of them was arranged on the highest floor of a tenement building. The representatives of two generations worked there together so successfully that the warm, family-like atmosphere can be felt there even today. The creative efforts of the previous generations of artists should certainly be respected, especially in such surroundings. The studio has two levels and the exhibition part is clearly separated from the studio part.

 

Art Studio of Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, photo by Michał Korta

Art Studio of Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, photo by Michał Korta

 

In the exhibition part the young artist presents works of her grandmother which are particularly meaningful to her. Barbara Pisarczyk-Niezgoda was a portrait and miniature painter who skillfully combined old painting techniques with the requirements of her times. On the walls we can see her sketches and drawings on paper. Portraits of children and landscape paintings by Barbara hang on the metal wall which stretches along both studio levels and stand on recessed shelves under the mezzanine.

The granddaughter of this talented artist manages to blend history with modern touches. The “studio part” is a space which gives the artist the freedom to conduct her own experiments and creative activities. In every single piece Paulina presents her own, unique sensitivity referring to the artistic traditions of her family on the one hand and drawing from contemporary trends in art and her own experience on the other. This is why her works draw a spectacularly huge response. Paulina actively contributes to the current events which shape the art scene in Warsaw. She designs exhibitions organized in renowned public institutions in the Polish capital city e.g. Zachęta National Gallery of Art, National Museum in Warsaw, The Xawery Dunikowski Museum of Sculpture in Królikarnia palacethe Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art and Arton Foundation. All these institutions have a long tradition and strongly focus on cooperation with artists of the young generation. Paulina’s experience related to working in this particular studio seems a vital factor which influences the exhibitions she designs.

It is worth noting that such strong interconnectedness between generations is not a coincidence. The studio I visited is one of the few Warsaw Historic Art Studios located in city apartments, which Warsaw authorities offer to artists and researchers as spaces for creative activities.

 

Art Studio of Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, photo by Michał Korta

Art Studio of Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, photo by Michał Korta

 

The history of this studio starts in 1982 when the artist Barbara Pisarczyk-Niezgoda received it in a rough state and converted it into her atelier. The Old Town was the only place on Warsaw’s map with many venues like that located mainly in the attics of the tenement houses. The interior of Barbara’s studio was changing continuously over the next 30 years. In 2019, following her death, her granddaughter Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda began the process of transformation of the atelier into a venue with the official status of the ‘historic art studio’. Only recently, Paulina’s studio has started housing cultural activities, for instance she hosted „Teraz Poliż” theatre collective. The atelier was also one of the stops on the Old Town with female dramaturgy walk, and hosted a performative reading of one of the texts with audience participation. Soon, students from the Faculty of New Media at the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw were invited to document the interior of the atelier and the objects gathered here.

Although Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda works in the interiors with a captivating history, she does not limit herself to this single place and emphasizes the role of space outside of her studio. Through one of the studio windows we can see the Blue Skyscraper located at the exact spot where the Great Synagogue stood in Tłomackie street in the past. When I asked the artist what the historical context meant for her creative activities, she mentioned the “Visual SPA” exhibition that was organized in the very same Blue Skyscraper. Paulina cooperated with Piotr Matosek and together they redesigned the office building, leaving it at the disposal of visual artists, musicians and performers from Poland, the UK, Ukraine, Germany, Israel and the USA. The visitors had three days to take a spiritual and mental breather while interacting with art. The transformation of this building from the sacred into the profane (i.e. from the synagogue into a SPA) symbolically but precisely presents the transformation of lifestyles of the city inhabitants and contemporary Warsaw in general, which constantly evolves and takes 180 degree turns. History is being absorbed into the present time, so it remains only in people’s memories. The work of Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda equals, in fact, writing the following chapters of the history of this extraordinary place.

 

Art Studio of Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, photo by Michał Korta

Art Studio of Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, photo by Michał Korta

 


Author: Patrycja Głusiec

Holds a degree in Polish Philology and History of Art from the University of Warsaw. She also graduated from the Academy of Photography in Warsaw. Currently works on her own photography projects. She cooperated with the National Museum in Warsaw in the years 2015–2019. Currently cooperates with the Foksal Gallery Foundation. Since 2019 a contributor to Contemporary Lynx magazine, where she mainly provides materials on contemporary photography.

Photos: Michał Korta

An independent portrait photographer who teaches photography in Poland and Switzerland.

His latest projects include: “Byłe republiki rosyjskie” (The Former Russian Republics), „Kazachski zsiadł z konia” (A Kazakh Got Off a Horse), „Żołnierze izraelskie” (Israeli Soldiers), „Balkan Playground”, „The Shadow Line” and „Painter’s Notebook”.

Translated by Joanna Pietrak

The project is co-financed by the Capital City of Warsaw

The project is co-financed by the Capital City of Warsaw

 

Art Studio of Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, photo by Michał Korta

Art Studio of Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, photo by Michał Korta


PROJEKTUJĄC WSPÓŁCZESNĄ WARSZAWĘ.

WIZYTA W PRACOWNI HISTORYCZNEJ PAULINY TYRO-NIEZGODY

Słoneczny dzień, Rynek Nowego Miasta w Warszawie, widok na kościół św. Kazimierza, zaprojektowany w stylu palladiańskim przez Tylmana van Gameren. W tym malowniczym, pocztówkowym miejscu, przyciągającym głównie turystów lokalni mieszkańcy nikną w tłumie. Dlatego podczas spaceru po tej czarującej części miasta myśli się zwykle o dawnych historiach warszawiaków, dziejach miasta zapisanych w murach urokliwych kamienic. Patrzy się na nie zwykle jak na atrakcje turystyczne, tymczasem to właśnie one kryją w sobie niesamowite i żywe historie dzisiejszych mieszkańców Warszawy, twórców związanych z kulturą i sztuką. Kultura jest zawsze kołem napędowym przemian społecznych oraz niezwykle istotnym elementem tożsamości kulturowej. To między innymi właśnie w tych domach, pracowniach ukrytych w starych murach tworzy się aktualna Warszawa. 

Jedną z tych tajemnic odkryła przede mną projektantka wystaw, Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, która zaprosiła mnie do zajmowanej przez siebie przestronnej pracowni, znajdującej się na poddaszu tuż przy Rynku Nowego Miasta w Warszawie, dokładnie na ulicy Freta. Należy jednak zaznaczyć, że pracownia znajduje się na terenie śródmiejskiej starówki. Miejsce to bezsprzecznie łączy w sobie tradycję z nowoczesnością.

 

Art Studio of Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, photo by Michał Korta

Art Studio of Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, photo by Michał Korta

 

Pracownia od początku lat 80. XX wieku użytkowana była przez babcię artystki, Barbarę Pisarczyk-Niezgodę, malarkę, ilustratorkę oraz dokumentalistkę architektury historycznej. Przez pewien czas zaaranżowaną na ostatniej kondygnacji budynku mieszkalnego pracownię Pisarczyk-Niezgoda dzieliła z synem Pawłem, absolwentem wzornictwa przemysłowego oraz jego żoną – Aliną Tyro-Niezgodą. Współpraca międzypokoleniowa przyczyniła się do tego, że w miejscu tym do dzisiaj odczuwa się rodzinną atmosferę. Nie można odmówić szacunku dla twórczości poprzednich pokoleń. Dwupoziomowa pracownia ma obecnie jasny podział na część ekspozycyjną oraz warsztatową.

W wyraźnie wydzielonej części ekspozycyjnej młoda artystka umieściła szczególnie ważne dla niej prace babci, która była portrecistką oraz miniaturzystką. Barbara Pisarczyk-Niezgoda potrafiła trafnie połączyć dawne techniki z wymaganiami jej czasów. Na ścianach widzimy jej szkice i rysunki na papierze. Na metalowej ścianie przechodzącej przez dwa poziomy pracowni oraz na półkach-niszach ukrytych pod antresolą pracowni zawieszone są lub poustawiane obrazy autorstwa Pani Barbary, pejzaże i portrety, a także prace zaprzyjaźnionych z nią twórców.

Wnuczka natomiast łączy historię ze współczesnością. Część warsztatowa jest miejscem, pozwalającym artystce na jej własne eksperymenty i działania twórcze. Czerpiąc z jednej strony z tradycji artystycznej swojej rodziny, a z drugiej sięgając do współczesnej myśli o sztuce oraz własnego doświadczenia wnosi unikalną wrażliwość, którą widać w jej kolejnych realizacjach. A mają one niezwykle szeroki oddźwięk. Paulina współtworzy aktualne wydarzenia wpływające na obraz sceny artystycznej Warszawy projektując kolejne wystawy w najważniejszych instytucjach publicznych w mieście (m.in. w Zachęcie – Narodowej Galerii Sztuki, Muzeum Narodowym w Warszawie, w Muzeum Rzeźby im. Xawerego Dunikowskiego w KrólikarniCentrum Sztuki Współczesnej Zamek Ujazdowski, czy Fundacji Arton). Są to instytucje o silnej tradycji kładące bardzo duży nacisk na współpracę z młodym pokoleniem twórców. Wydaje się zatem, że atmosfera, które Paulina wynosi z pracowni, jest ważnym elementem, który wpływa na kształt projektowanych przez nią ekspozycji.

 

Art Studio of Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, photo by Michał Korta

Art Studio of Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, photo by Michał Korta

 

Warto w tym miejscu zwrócić uwagę, że takie silne połączenie międzypokoleniowe nie jest przypadkiem. Odwiedzana przeze mnie pracownia należy do zespołu Warszawskich Historycznych Pracowni Artystycznych, znajdujących się w wyznaczonych do tej funkcji lokalach miejskich udostępnianych przez władze Warszawy pod pracownie kolejnym twórcom, opiekunom i badaczom.

Historia tej pracowni zaczęła się w 1982 roku. Wtedy to wspomnianej powyżej malarce — Barbarze Pisarczyk-Niezgodzie przydzielono przestrzeń, w której mogła zorganizować swoje miejsce pracy. Starówka była jednym z miejsc na mapie Warszawy, gdzie takich pomieszczeń było sporo – lokowano je głównie na strychach kamienic. Pracownia Barbary, w momencie oddania do użytkowania, była w stanie surowym. Doprowadzenie jej do użyteczności było koniecznością, a w związku z tym, wnętrze zmieniało się w zasadzie w trybie ciągłym przez kolejnych 30 lat. W 2019 rok, po śmierci artystki, jej wnuczka Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda zaczęła starania o uzyskanie statusu pracowni historycznej. Obok goszczenia kolejnych pokoleń artystów miejsce jest otwarte na działania kulturalne miasta. Ugościła między innymi kolektyw teatralny „Teraz Poliż”. Przestrzeń była także jednym z przystanków staromiejskiego spaceru z dramaturgią kobiecą, w ramach którego odbyło się tu performatywne czytanie jednego z tekstów przy udziale publiczności. Niebawem pojawią się tu także studenci z Wydziału Nowych Mediów warszawskiej Akademii Sztuk Pięknych, z zadaniem wykonania autorskiej dokumentacji wnętrza i zgromadzonych tu obiektów.

Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda otoczona wnętrzem o tak bogatej historii nie zamyka się tylko na nie, mówi również o roli przestrzeni poza pracownią. Jedno z okien wychodzi na Błękitny Wieżowiec w Warszawie, na miejscu którego stała kiedyś Wielka Synagoga przy placu Tłomackie. Artystka zapytana o znaczenie kontekstu historycznego w jej działaniach podała realizację wystawy „Wizualne SPA”, które odbyło się właśnie w Błękitnym Wieżowcu. Paulina wraz z Piotrem Matoskiem przearanżowali jedno z pięter biurowego budynku i oddali go w ręce artystów sztuk wizualnych, muzyków i performerów z Polski, Wielkiej Brytanii, Ukrainy, Niemiec, Izraela i USA. Przez trzy dni zwiedzający mogli poddać się duchowemu  relaksowi obcując ze sztuką. Przemiana budynku – z synagogi na biurowiec – w symboliczny sposób obrazuje przemiany w funkcjonowaniu miasta oraz współczesny obraz stolicy stale zmieniającej swoje oblicze. Historia zostaje wchłonięta przez współczesność. Działania Pauliny Tyro–Niezgody piszą dalszą historię tego niezwykłego miejsca.

 

Art Studio of Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, photo by Michał Korta

Art Studio of Paulina Tyro-Niezgoda, photo by Michał Korta

 


Autor tekstu: Patrycja Głusiec

Absolwentka filologii polskiej oraz historii sztuki na Uniwersytecie Warszawskim. Ukończyła również Akademię Fotografii w Warszawie. Obecnie pracuje nad osobistymi projektami fotograficznymi. W latach 2015-2019 była związana z Muzeum Narodowym w Warszawie. Współpracuje z Fundacją Galerii Foksal. Od 2019 roku jest związana z magazynem Contemporary Lynx, gdzie koncentruje się głównie na fotografii współczesnej.

Zdjęcia: Michał Korta

Korta jest niezależnym fotografem portretowym i wykładowcą fotografii w Polsce i Szwajcarii.

Najnowsze projekty obejmują: „Byłe republiki rosyjskie”, „Kazachski zsiadł z konia”, „Żołnierze izraelskie”, „Balkan Playground”, „The Shadow Line” i „Painter’s Notebook”.

Korekta: Sylwia Krasoń